Welcome


While most bills are simple text written in statute in order to convey a message, this resolution, to establish a right to food, is pure poetry. Whether it is the theory of Evolution or of Creationism, the Right to Food is the Original Right of all living beings. … This isn’t a bill, it isn’t a resolution, it’s a manifesto of our Original Right. It’s a public health statement, it’s an affirmation of our relationship with Mother Earth, and it speaks to the spirit of Maine.”

– Representative Justin Fecteau

Right to food. All individuals have a natural, inherent and unalienable right to food, including the right to save and exchange seeds, and the right to grow, raise, harvest, produce and consume the food of their own choosing for their own nourishment, sustenance, bodily health and well-being, as long as an individual does not commit trespassing, theft, poaching or other abuses of private property rights, public lands or natural resources in the harvesting, production or acquisition of food.


We, the people of Maine, face a critical choice and historic moment this November 2 at the ballot box. Question 3 will ask us if we wish to amend the Constitution of Maine to secure for all individuals a natural, inherent and unalienable Right to Food. The People of the State get a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to decide if we want to enshrine in our Declaration of Rights the right to grow, access, and consume the nourishing food of our choosing with dignity and self-determination.

Question 3 reads as follows:

“Do you favor amending the Constitution of Maine to declare that all individuals have a natural, inherent and unalienable right to grow, raise, harvest, produce and consume the food of their own choosing for their own nourishment, sustenance, bodily health and well-being?”

When we VOTE YES on Question 3, the constitutional language above will be added as Section 25 to Article I of the Constitution of Maine.



Interested in joining the Right to Food for Maine campaign? Click here.


FDA’s Views on Freedom of Choice

“There is no absolute right to consume or feed children any particular food.”

“There is no ‘deeply rooted’ historical tradition of unfettered access to foods of all kinds.”

“[The] assertion of a fundamental right to their own bodily and physical health…is unavailing because [consumers] do not have a fundamental right to obtain any food they wish.”

Source

Our Views on Freedom of Choice

A constitutional amendment to secure a right to food is an antidote to corporate control of our food supply and how communities interact. It shifts power from corporation to individual citizens.

An enumerated right is to protect individual liberty – NOT a provision from the government.

The proposed amendment carefully constructs a human rights framework that secures the individual rights of the people while cautiously guarding against abuse.

  • It becomes a metric and a standard to inform and guide policy priorities and lawmaking
  • It increases Maine food resilience and supports Maine food self-sufficiency
  • It decentralizes food production and decision-making to create a more secure food system

Key Facts about the Right to food for Maine

  • 73% of the Maine House and 70% of the Maine Senate voted to bring the Right to Food question to the ballot box this November.
  • Private property rights are protected.
  • The right to food will not limit or constrain other rights.
  • Department oversight of food processing and commerce is protected.
  • The right to food does not mean society must provide food for certain groups of people.

Paid for by Right to Food for Maine, 192 Annabessacook Road, Winthrop, ME 04364